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Thomas Nashe

Nashe also spelled  Nash  
born 1567, Lowestoft, Suffolk, Eng.
died c. 1601, Yarmouth, Norfolk?

Photograph:Thomas Nashe, engraving from a pamphlet The Trimming of Thomas Nashe …
Thomas Nashe, engraving from a pamphlet The Trimming of Thomas Nashe
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

pamphleteer, poet, dramatist, and author of The Unfortunate Traveller; or, The Life of Jacke Wilton (1594), the first picaresque novel in English.

Nashe was educated at the University of Cambridge, and about 1588 he went to London, where he became associated with Robert Greene and other professional writers. In 1589 he wrote The Anatomie of Absurditie and the preface to Greene's Menaphon. Both works are bold, opinionated surveys of the contemporary state of writing; occasionally obscure, they are euphuistic in style and range freely over a great variety of topics.

In 1589 and 1590 he evidently became a paid hack of the episcopacy in the Marprelate controversy and matched wits with the unidentified Puritan “Martin.” Almost all the Anglican replies to Martin have variously been assigned to Nashe, but only An Almond for a Parrat (1590) has been convincingly attributed to him. He wrote the preface to Thomas Newman's unauthorized edition of Sir Philip Sidney's Astrophel and Stella (1591). Though Nashe penned an extravagant dedication to Sidney's sister, the countess of Pembroke, the book was withdrawn and reissued in the same year without Nashe's foreword.

Pierce Penilesse His Supplication to the Divell (1592), a satire focused on the seven deadly sins, was Nashe's first distinctive work. Using a free and extemporaneous prose style, full of colloquialisms, newly coined words, and fantastic idiosyncrasies, Nashe buttonholes the reader with a story in which a need for immediate entertainment seems to predominate over any narrative structure or controlling objective. Having become involved in his friend Greene's feud with the writer Gabriel Harvey, Nashe satirized Harvey and his brothers in Pierce and then joined the combat in an exchange of pamphlets with Harvey, Strange Newes (1592) and Have with You to Saffron-Walden (1596). If Harvey is to be credited, Nashe was a hack for the printer John Danter in 1593. The controversy was terminated in 1599, when the archbishop of Canterbury ordered that “all Nasshes bookes and Doctor Harveyes bookes be taken wheresoever they maye be found and that none of theire bookes bee ever printed hereafter.”

Apparently Nashe wrote Strange Newes while he was living at the home of Sir George Carey, who momentarily relieved his oppressive poverty. In Christs Teares over Jerusalem (1593), Nashe warned his countrymen during one of the country's worst outbreaks of bubonic plague that, unless they reformed, London would suffer the fate of Jerusalem. The Terrors of the Night (1594) is a discursive, sometimes bewildering, attack on demonology.

Pierce Penilesse excepted, Nashe's most successful works were his entertainment Summers Last Will and Testament (1592, published 1600); his picaresque novel The Unfortunate Traveller; or, The Life of Jacke Wilton; Dido, Queen of Carthage (1594; with Christopher Marlowe); and Nashes Lenten Stuffe (1599). The Unfortunate Traveller is a brutal and realistic tale of adventure narrated with speed and economy. The book describes the travels through Germany and Italy of its rogue hero, Jacke Wilton, who lives by his wits and witnesses all sorts of historic events before he is converted to a better way of life. Lenten Stuffe, in praise of herrings, contains a charming description of the town of Yarmouth, Norfolk, a herring fishery. Nashe retreated to Yarmouth when he and Ben Jonson were prosecuted as a result of their satirical play The Isle of Dogs (1597).

Nashe was the first of the English prose eccentrics, an extraordinary inventor of verbal hybrids. The Works were edited by R.B. McKerrow, 5 vol. (1904–10; reprinted and reedited by F.P. Wilson, 1958).

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